About Hearing Loss | Hanics Technology

Hearing loss is being partly or totally unable to hear sound in one or both ears.

Considerations

Symptoms of hearing loss may include:

  • Certain sounds seem too loud
  • Difficulty following conversations when two or more people are talking
  • Difficulty hearing in noisy areas
  • Hard to tell high-pitched sounds (such as "s" or "th") from one another
  • Less trouble hearing men's voices than women's voices
  • Problems hearing when there is background noise
  • Voices that sound mumbled or slurred

Other symptoms include:

Causes
Conductive hearing loss (CHL) occurs because of a mechanical problem in the outer or middle ear.

  • The three tiny bones of the ear (ossicles) may not conduct sound properly.
  • Or, the eardrum may not vibrate in response to sound.

Causes of conductive hearing loss can often be treated. They include:

  • Buildup of wax in the ear canal
  • Damage to the very small bones (ossicles) that are right behind the eardrum
  • Fluid that stays in the ear after an ear infection
  • Foreign object that is stuck in the ear canal
  • Hole in the eardrum
  • Scar on the eardrum from repeat infections
Sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) occurs when the tiny hair cells (nerve endings) that detect sound in the ear are injured, diseased, do not work correctly, or have died. This type of hearing loss often cannot be reversed.

Sensorineural hearing loss is commonly caused by:

Hearing loss may be present at birth (congenital) and can be due to:

  • Birth defects that cause changes in the ear structures
  • Genetic conditions (more than 400 are known)
  • Infections the mother passes to her baby in the womb (such as toxoplasmosisrubella, or herpes

The ear can also be injured by:

Home Care
You can often flush wax buildup out of the ear (gently) with ear syringes (available in drug stores) and warm water. Wax softeners (like Cerumenex) may be needed if the wax is hard and stuck in the ear.
Take care when removing foreign objects from the ear. Unless it is easy to get to, have your health care provider remove the object. Don't use sharp instruments to remove foreign objects.
See your health care provider for any other hearing loss.

When to Contact a Medical Professional
Call your health care provider if:

  • Hearing problems interfere with your lifestyle
  • Hearing problems do not go away or become worse
  • The hearing is worse in one ear than the other
  • You have sudden, severe hearing loss or ringing in the ears (tinnitus)
  • You have other symptoms, such as ear pain, along with hearing problems
  • You have new headaches, weakness, or numbness anywhere on your body