How to do we hear | Hanics Technology

 

Your ears pick up sound which travels in invisible waves through the air.
Sound occurs when a moving or vibrating object causes the air around it to move.

Sound waves travel down the ear canal and hit the eardrum in the middle ear.
This causes the eardrum to vibrate. Three tiny bones in your middle ear link
the vibrating eardrum to the cochlea in the inner ear.
The cochlea is filled with liquid that carries the vibrations to thousands of tiny
hair cells sitting on a membrane that stretches the length of the cochlea.
The hair cells on the membrane fire off tiny electrical signals.
These electrical signals travel up the cochlea nerves of the auditory pathway to the brain.
All this happens in a fraction of a second.
When we detect sounds, or noise, our body is changing the energy in
sound waves into nerve impulses which the brain interprets.
SOUND WAVES are produced when the air is mechanically disturbed.
Sound is measured by its:

 

How to do we hear | Hanics Technology

• frequency - This is the pitch (high or low) of a sound -- the number of complete sound wave cycles each second. High frequency noises are more damaging to hearing than low frequency noises.
• intensity - This is the loudness of a sound. It's measured in decibels (dB).
When we hear a sound, this is what actually takes place:
1. SOUND WAVES enter the ear canal and cause the eardrum to vibrate.
2. VIBRATIONS pass through 3 connected bones in the middle ear
3. This motion SETS FLUID MOVING in the inner ear.
4. Moving fluid bends thousands of delicate hair-like cells which convert the vibrations into NERVE IMPULSES.
5. Nerve impulses are CARRIED to the brain by the auditory nerve
6. In the brain, these impulses are CONVERTED into what we "hear" as sound.